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Author Topic: Negotiating a salary by declining health insurance?  (Read 498 times)
kfeltenberger
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« Reply #20 on: August 30, 2019, 06:51:33 PM »

What is the position and how are you qualified for it?  Also, the coverage you have from outside the job; how certain is that over the long term? 

In the end, you only will know if you ask.  That said, don't negotiate yourself out of the position.

The position is for front desk receptionist/veterinary assistant (more front desk than anything else). I majored in psychology in college, with a heavy emphasis on animal behavior and conditioning. I was also a research assistant with my university's primate lab, where we did observational studies. I also volunteered as an EMT in college with the local fire dept. I also volunteered with a pet rescue during the summers. Just helping with the animals, and at their retail shop. I'm currently working as a cashier at REI, which isn't all that impressive, but we are trained to give really good customer service.

Your experience is mostly theoretical with a little hand's on in areas that aren't really applicable to a domestic pet veterinarian.  The pet rescue is good, probably the best practical skill that you've mentioned.  In the end, it isn't what you're worth, it is what they believe the position is worth.  I interviewed for a job recently where I was told that my qualifications and experience exceeded everyone in the department, the person who would be my supervisor, and that person's supervisor.  In short, he told me that with my background, I was "worth" about twice what the position I applied for would pay...and that fact wouldn't change what the position offered.

As for being concerned that you haven't heard anything, there are two things to consider; one, it is a Friday and they were probably busy with people dropping pets off for boarding for the weekend, and two, it is a holiday weekend.  That said, if you don't hear something Tuesday, I would call directly and speak to whoever issued the letter. 
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Kurt
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« Reply #21 on: August 30, 2019, 07:41:11 PM »

Do you think the way I worded the email was too aggressive maybe?
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Frostburg
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« Reply #22 on: August 30, 2019, 07:43:45 PM »

What is the position and how are you qualified for it?  Also, the coverage you have from outside the job; how certain is that over the long term? 

In the end, you only will know if you ask.  That said, don't negotiate yourself out of the position.

The position is for front desk receptionist/veterinary assistant (more front desk than anything else). I majored in psychology in college, with a heavy emphasis on animal behavior and conditioning. I was also a research assistant with my university's primate lab, where we did observational studies. I also volunteered as an EMT in college with the local fire dept. I also volunteered with a pet rescue during the summers. Just helping with the animals, and at their retail shop. I'm currently working as a cashier at REI, which isn't all that impressive, but we are trained to give really good customer service.

Your experience is mostly theoretical with a little hand's on in areas that aren't really applicable to a domestic pet veterinarian.  The pet rescue is good, probably the best practical skill that you've mentioned.  In the end, it isn't what you're worth, it is what they believe the position is worth.  I interviewed for a job recently where I was told that my qualifications and experience exceeded everyone in the department, the person who would be my supervisor, and that person's supervisor.  In short, he told me that with my background, I was "worth" about twice what the position I applied for would pay...and that fact wouldn't change what the position offered.

As for being concerned that you haven't heard anything, there are two things to consider; one, it is a Friday and they were probably busy with people dropping pets off for boarding for the weekend, and two, it is a holiday weekend.  That said, if you don't hear something Tuesday, I would call directly and speak to whoever issued the letter. 

Yeah, I mean, I'm there to learn. But I want to negotiate as much as I can. Living in D.C. isn't cheap, and most of my friends who graduated are making better than I am. I'm of no opinion that I am the best thing ever or anything, but I thought that this is how negotiations worked. I'm not sure how I actually rank up as a candidate since I am new to working in a vet office.
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kfeltenberger
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« Reply #23 on: August 30, 2019, 08:18:25 PM »

Do you think the way I worded the email was too aggressive maybe?

Too aggressive?  In this employment climate, probably.  I would have made it three paragraphs (I always try to do at least three in any business correspondence - intro, body, and summary/closing) and re-reading it, a lot of what you mentioned as justification for the salary increase isn't really relevant to the actual position.  What skills did the job listing say were required/good to have?  Those are what you should have zeroed in on.  Also, bringing up the cost of living probably undercut you; they live there and know the situation, and by bringing it up the way you did might signal that you're only looking at money rather than being part of the team.

I know...some of this seems counter intuitive; why would they overlook your education that you worked so hard for, or why would they do this or that?  They're looking at a position that has certain requirements, anything that they can get over and above those requirements is icing on the cake. 

I wouldn't ever tell an employer, or imply, that you're "there to learn".  Perhaps learn their policies and procedures, but they expect you to know the bulk of what is needed when they hire you.

Don't judge your success by that of your classmates'; they may have had other majors that had entry level opportunities that a psych degree doesn't offer. 

This last part is more food for thought...Do you have a goal of what you want to do in 10 years?  Does it have to be in DC?  If you really want to do something with a psych degree, you'll most likely need a MS or PhD, unless you have other skills/education to supplant it like going back to college and picking up some HR focused courses and perhaps leveraging your existing credits into a degree in HR or business.  Coupled with a psych degree, that could be very attractive.

If you want, PM me and we can discuss this off list.

Kurt
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Kurt
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« Reply #24 on: August 30, 2019, 08:31:40 PM »

Okay. Iím going out to meet with some friends tonight. I will message you tomorrow in the early afternoon.
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Frostburg
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« Reply #25 on: September 09, 2019, 11:23:53 PM »

Oh yeah. Just to update this thread for anyone else who might find themselves in a similar position as me. I sent the email, and it took them a week to respond due to the holidays, but they offered me $18.25 an hour, so that is a win!
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xpdchief
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« Reply #26 on: September 10, 2019, 05:34:44 AM »

Congratulations!
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Respectfully submitted,
Brian
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« Reply #27 on: September 10, 2019, 08:11:03 AM »

Oh yeah. Just to update this thread for anyone else who might find themselves in a similar position as me. I sent the email, and it took them a week to respond due to the holidays, but they offered me $18.25 an hour, so that is a win!

Boom! Told you it will happen ... congrats ... negotiating a salary is a great skill to have for both you and the employer.
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