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Author Topic: BRAKE FOR X95  (Read 571 times)
targetshooter77
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« on: January 24, 2019, 09:50:56 PM »

I don't want to screw anything up, so I'm asking first before I do:
I want to change the muzzle brake on my x95.  Is the old one (brand new gun) just wrenched on, or is there some kind of "adhesive" holding it on, ala LOCTITE?

Thanks for the help.

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thehun
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« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2019, 11:05:44 PM »

I would highly advise to not run a brake...its pretty concussive...I run a PWS Triad...works like a charm.
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DubageL
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« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2019, 07:07:35 AM »

The factory flash hider is threaded on. It is held on with a jam nut behind it. The manual should have a section on removal. You will need 2 wrenches. Basically you hold the flash hider with one wrench and use the other to back off the jam nut. Spray a bit of oil on them first to help loosen them up.
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cm8404
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X95, NRA & SAF Life Member


« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2019, 10:01:07 AM »

IWI has a good video on this procedure.   Tom is the instructor and itís on their website.
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TNC
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« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2019, 12:29:17 PM »

I would highly advise to not run a brake...its pretty concussive...I run a PWS Triad...works like a charm.

I guess it might depend on how and where you shoot.  I agree that brakes are an annoyance at ranges with other shooters, especially indoor ranges.  I think I'd hate one on my Tavor at a SWAT class during the building segments shooting indoors.

And frankly, does one really need a brake for a 5.56 rifle?  I'm all for personal preference, so one should do what they want.  I only have a brake on my RFB and two AR10's.  I don't shoot at ranges.
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MajorKong
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« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2019, 01:11:25 PM »

The factory flash suppressor is just threaded on.  If I recall correctly it takes 2 7/8" wrenches to remove. 
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targetshooter77
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« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2019, 01:49:41 PM »

thanks for all the input.  I have bad hearing, wear hearing aids and am a bit concerned about noise.  Dont want to go through the Silencer process, and am aware that the end of the barrel is pretty close to my head, so I got a noise director (my name) that intends to direct the noise forward.

Hey I'll give it a cheap chance before sinking a lot of money into expensive headsets or silencers. 

I'll let you know how it works!

Ron
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downeyg
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« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2019, 03:17:03 PM »

      I have the Epsilon VG6 muzzle brake on my X-95.  The muzzle break is a little louder but after all, it is a rifle making noise (rifles are loud) so just use good hearing protection.  I shot my rifle in an indoor range and there was no issue with the noise or muzzle blast. 
      Installation was straight forward and uncomplicated.  Oil was not required for removal because a jam nut is used.  Make sure you mount the rife in something so it does not move around.  I have a piece of wood that has the dimensions of a magazine with a hole where the magazine release engages it.  I put the piece of wood in a vice and slide the rifle over it.  Hold the flash hider still with a wrench and use a second wrench to loosen the jam nut.  The hardest part of the installation was lining it up the muzzle break.  If you put tape (I used painters tape) on each wrench surface, you will not scratch anything.  Take our time and everything will come out perfect. 
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HBeretta
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« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2019, 07:04:38 PM »

https://www.instagram.com/p/BtOcwa8guFF/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link
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Furluge
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« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2019, 11:16:07 PM »

      I have the Epsilon VG6 muzzle brake on my X-95.  The muzzle break is a little louder but after all, it is a rifle making noise (rifles are loud) so just use good hearing protection.  I shot my rifle in an indoor range and there was no issue with the noise or muzzle blast. 
      Installation was straight forward and uncomplicated.  Oil was not required for removal because a jam nut is used.  Make sure you mount the rife in something so it does not move around.  I have a piece of wood that has the dimensions of a magazine with a hole where the magazine release engages it.  I put the piece of wood in a vice and slide the rifle over it.  Hold the flash hider still with a wrench and use a second wrench to loosen the jam nut.  The hardest part of the installation was lining it up the muzzle break.  If you put tape (I used painters tape) on each wrench surface, you will not scratch anything.  Take our time and everything will come out perfect. 


I've got the same one and one reason I'd recommend it is a because of the cage. I also think Manticore Arm's afterburner setup is a good choice as well. It's direct the blast and noise away from you and make non-suppressed shooting more comfortable and you can put on a brake or flash hider if you want to. I like that the epsillon gives you comp and flash hiding at the same time but sometimes I rather I could send the blast foward.
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Bullpup777
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« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2019, 07:15:12 AM »

Check out the Lantac Dragon with their Blast Mitigation Device (BMD). The Dragon is the best Comp/Brake on the market. The BMD is QD and directs noise and flash forward while retaining the Dragon's excellent Comp/Brake properties - only device on the market that dies this.
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pyroxide
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« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2019, 08:07:13 PM »

Check out the Lantac Dragon with their Blast Mitigation Device (BMD). The Dragon is the best Comp/Brake on the market. The BMD is QD and directs noise and flash forward while retaining the Dragon's excellent Comp/Brake properties - only device on the market that dies this.
Strike Industries has various muzzle devices that can fit the Oppressor that does the same thing.
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Rastoff
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« Reply #12 on: February 15, 2019, 12:37:30 PM »

Best on the market? Well, that's a broad statement and should be followed by "in my opinion."

There are hundreds of muzzle brakes or devices on the market. All claim to be the best. All have some shortcomings. Take a look at these tests:
https://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/2014/11/jeremy-s/556-muzzle-device-shootout/
https://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/2015/04/jeremy-s/ar-15-muzzle-brake-shootout-2/
https://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/2016/10/jeremy-s/ar-15-muzzle-brake-shootout-3/

Also consider these tests:
https://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/2015/06/jeremy-s/ar-15-flash-hider-shootout/
https://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/2015/12/jeremy-s/ar-15-flash-hiding-test-2/

The question is, what do you want your muzzle device to do? If recoil reduction is your only concern, the Miculek brake at about $30 is hard to beat. Of course there are some that are better at reducing recoil, but they cost more.

If reducing muzzle flash is your goal, the original A2 "bird cage" is a great option and your gun came with one so, free.

If you want to compensate for muzzle rise, well, that's another consideration.

If you want something to do all three, you'll need to make compromises in each requirement.

Another consideration is size and shape. Because the forearm of the X95 is a solid piece, it has to slip over the muzzle device to be removed. So, if you have to pin and weld the muzzle device, or just don't want to have to remove it to remove the forearm, the shape and diameter of the muzzle device must be taken into consideration as well.



For me the main goal is help controlling the muzzle. Since the bore is so low in the X95, compensating for muzzle rise isn't the main issue. I also want to reduce muzzle flash so, I went with a device that was middle of the road as far as recoil reduction and compensation, but offered decent flash suppression. I also have to ensure proper length so, I couldn't go too short.

All these things work together to make up what anyone will want in a muzzle device.
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