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| | | |-+  Tavor SAR - Normal Wear or else after only 100 rounds or so?
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Author Topic: Tavor SAR - Normal Wear or else after only 100 rounds or so?  (Read 2458 times)
Halmbarte
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« Reply #20 on: January 07, 2019, 10:55:21 PM »

About the gas piston thing, I did an informal test a while back.

First we have the gas piston from a Steyr AUG as removed when the gas system wasn't lubricated between shooting sessions. Total of about 100 rounds fired over 3 shooting sessions.



This is the same gas piston after rubbing with a dry soft cloth. No solvent of any type was used to clean it.



Next is the gas piston after adding 1 drop of oil* to the gas piston after each shooting session. About 120 rounds fired in 3 shooting sessions. The piston wasn't removed to apply oil, I just did one drop on the face of the piston. The oil has crept over the entire surface of the gas piston and the whole thing is oily.



This is the same gas piston after rubbing with a dry soft cloth. No solvent of any type was used to clean it.



There wasn't appreciably more carbon on the piston after applying oil and then shooting it. What carbon there was was much easier to remove after it had the oil on it.

H

*Aeroshell Fluid 18
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cciman
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« Reply #21 on: January 08, 2019, 12:28:04 PM »


Interesting, food for thought.

100-120 rounds is about 3-4 mags of ammo.
Carbine Classes I have taken: we were minimally using that amount of ammo up at least every 2 hours, for 8-12 hours, without weapon cleaning.  Daily for 2-5 days.

Both the flash points and "burning" temps referenced for cooking oil and motor oil are similar...  in the 450F-500F degree range for burning, 250-280F for smoke point.

I cook primarily with canola oil in cast iron pans, and they do not shine after wiping off with a cloth.  Those pans have never been shiny.  The avr surface temps reached (measured with infrared temp sensor, with burners on) before the oil starts to smoke is about 350F.   I have put a "greased pan" in the weber and turned up the burners, and the heat burned the oil completely off, without visual addition to the conditioning.

Put a drop of your favorite gun oil on your exhaust manifold or tail pipe, next to a drop of motor oil, watch the behavior when the car is turned on.


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whiskey91lima
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« Reply #22 on: January 08, 2019, 01:10:14 PM »


Interesting, food for thought.

100-120 rounds is about 3-4 mags of ammo.
Carbine Classes I have taken: we were minimally using that amount of ammo up at least every 2 hours, for 8-12 hours, without weapon cleaning.  Daily for 2-5 days.

Both the flash points and "burning" temps referenced for cooking oil and motor oil are similar...  in the 450F-500F degree range for burning, 250-280F for smoke point.

I cook primarily with canola oil in cast iron pans, and they do not shine after wiping off with a cloth.  Those pans have never been shiny.  The avr surface temps reached (measured with infrared temp sensor, with burners on) before the oil starts to smoke is about 350F.   I have put a "greased pan" in the weber and turned up the burners, and the heat burned the oil completely off, without visual addition to the conditioning.

Put a drop of your favorite gun oil on your exhaust manifold or tail pipe, next to a drop of motor oil, watch the behavior when the car is turned on.


So use canola oil or motor oil for gun lubrication?

In my experience, FireClean (canola oil) and FrogLube (coconut oil) actually work quite well as gun lube particularly for carbon fowling. I have switched back to CLP (carbon fowling) and white lithium grease (non-carbon fowling parts of my gun) for the arguments that organic oils breakdown over time and have lower flash points. I also take the approach of cleaning with CLP and wiping down the parts as much as possible. The idea is to let the oil soak into the pores of the metal rather than coat the surface. I've had failures from carbon gumming up in excessive oil (the striker channel in my P320 had it worst to the point that it only would run dry).
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thehun
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« Reply #23 on: January 08, 2019, 03:15:41 PM »

Slip2000 EWL is my go to all around lubricant...it also gently cleans...carbon doesn't stick and it doesn't run off like some lubs.
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cciman
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« Reply #24 on: January 08, 2019, 06:32:01 PM »



So use canola oil or motor oil for gun lubrication?


That is not the intention of my post, I was not in favor of any specific oil or lubricant.  Really I was addressing (giving perspective) whether or not to put any lubricant on the piston, which the post prior to mine was advocating.  I would be concerned about putting any liquid/gel material that has the potential to carbonize or leave additional residues at 350F.



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Halmbarte
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« Reply #25 on: January 08, 2019, 08:50:36 PM »



So use canola oil or motor oil for gun lubrication?


That is not the intention of my post, I was not in favor of any specific oil or lubricant.  Really I was addressing (giving perspective) whether or not to put any lubricant on the piston, which the post prior to mine was advocating.  I would be concerned about putting any liquid/gel material that has the potential to carbonize or leave additional residues at 350F.

The point I was attempting to make was that the added gun oil does burn off after firing. By adding the oil after firing the carbon fouling wipes off better* when you do get around to cleaning. The burnt oil doesn't seem to add a significant amount of carbon compared to the powder fouling.

In the end it probably doesn't seem to matter a whole lot.

H

*Hard chrome helps here.
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