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| |-+  Kel-Tec RFB, RDB, M-43 (Moderator: Ronmar)
| | |-+  Picking rdb over a iwi x95 a mistake?
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Author Topic: Picking rdb over a iwi x95 a mistake?  (Read 6486 times)
Berkley
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« Reply #20 on: March 18, 2018, 09:22:35 PM »

Ive owned original tavor, rfb and now rdb.  Ill sum it up by saying I sold the tavor and kept both Kel-Tec.  Now, the tavor is a wonderful rifle and I kinda regret selling it, HOWEVER, the Kel-Tecs are IMO superior in these regards:

1 adjustable gas

2 designed and built in USA

3 very high quality built

4 far superior triggers, unless you spend 400$ on a trigger for the tavor.  

5 factory adjustable length stocks

6 lifetime warranted

7 politely deposit valuable brass onto your feet. Very important to me as I reload that stuff.  

8 More ambidextrous and definitely safer brass management regarding your face.  Yes tavor shoots lefty but its still kinda distracting, having smokey hot brass fling 1/2 past your nose.

9 Bolt release always seemed clunky on tavor to me.  All variations of keltecs one is nice.  

10 has traditional trigger guard. Tavors unique grip guard I like, but would like a trigger guard as well. I felt like things could get in there easier like sticks gear or whatever.  

11 softer shooting than ANY other rifle in their respective calibers.  At least that I know of.  Shooting a tuned suppressed rfb feels like a gentle shoulder rub.  



TAVOR is superior in these regards:

1 Nice Built in BUIS

2 battle proven

3 built in button switch area for light or laser



So, you can see rdb offers a lot.  Having said that dont feel the tavor isnt excellent they are awesome!  Just save up for a Kel-Tec or two also.  

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BellatorInvictus
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« Reply #21 on: March 19, 2018, 12:35:52 AM »

For me it's a no brainer--I'd take a Tavor or Micro Tavor any day over a Keltec bullpup. But I'm a Tavor guy and fell in love with them the first time I shot one. I've never shot an RDB so I can't compare. If I were to shoot one, maybe I'd love that too. So really, OP, before you drop the cash, you simply MUST go and handle each of these rifles in person and shoot them if possible before making a decision. I think it's fair to say that the X95 is in a higher class of firearm, since it was designed specifically for combat and has proven itself to hold up very well in that capacity. Not that the RDB can't do it too, but, well... The Tavor has been adopted by militaries and police forces all over the world. That sets it apart.
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"Ideas are more powerful than guns. We would not let our enemies have guns, why should we let them have ideas?" -Stalin
Berkley
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« Reply #22 on: March 19, 2018, 10:56:13 AM »

I see this suggestion frequently but would you mind describing exactly how someone would do this?  Ive seen one tavor on a shelf once ever, and never ever have I seen any Kel-Tec rifle of any type on a shelf.  So, how?!
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Siris
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« Reply #23 on: March 22, 2018, 07:38:31 PM »

I see this suggestion frequently but would you mind describing exactly how someone would do this?  Ive seen one tavor on a shelf once ever, and never ever have I seen any Kel-Tec rifle of any type on a shelf.  So, how?!

i know of one rdb on a shelf here and another shop that's had three tavors for probably a year plus now. Might just have to look around. Having handled both (and fired neither) I like the way the RDB feels in my shoulder better personally, the Tavor is nice in the shoulder but it's chunky. Also I like the fact that I can swap shoulders with the RDB and not have brass in my face which is why I was looking at buying one of those before I opted for the MDR. In the end, I'd agree with the earlier post, go digging and see if you can find at least one or the other and get some hands on.
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Spike Bull
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« Reply #24 on: March 23, 2018, 02:35:49 PM »

I carry a Rock River AR daily for work for the last nine years and train and qualify with it.

 I had been lurking around bullpup sites for 2 years before I decided to buy an RFB last fall. I know a guy who works for IWI at the SHOT show and special projects who is a great resource and I have seen about every youtube video on every bullpup, available or not, at least twice.

Based on that info and my experience with the RFB I would buy an RDB in a heart beat. I will look for one, maybe an S, in the fall. The RFB is heavy and I do not want another heavy rifle, especially in 5.56!

An X95 with a loaded magazine and a one pound sighting system will be pushing around 11 pounds!!!
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cciman
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« Reply #25 on: May 05, 2018, 08:58:18 AM »

Having briefly owned the RDB, and also TAVor, and X95, here is my logic contrary to all of the above:

Failure drills  -  I have trained with the X95 in several tactical carbine classes, and the failure drills (when the gun fails during firing- typically because of a misfeed or mis-ejection) are doable.  What happens when the RDB fails because of a casing failing to eject, or a double feed into the chamber?

Sure its sexy to be lightweight, but how many of you are actually going to go beyond carrying the weapons for longer than a week, or will be carrying 90# of gear with the carbine?   BTW, the X95 and formerly the SAR is the IDF duty weapon.      Better to have a Hummer than a Civic.

You can train for ambi (yup, it takes more work).

IWI's are battle proven- used by many IDF conscript soldiers with common gun skills, being adopted for use in several US LE duty environments.  RDB: ??
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JesseJames38
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« Reply #26 on: May 05, 2018, 11:44:20 AM »

these are the only people I have seen that toe the Kel-tec line for police use.  http://uscsog.com/  On the other hand the OP already picked one of the IWI Tavor rifles. 

On that note, I could see my self picking up a RDB for fun or hunting.  Defensive rifle, possibly.  That said I would pick a Tavor over the RDB for a defensive rifle.


Jesse.
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Frostburg
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« Reply #27 on: May 07, 2018, 02:19:30 AM »

RDB is reliable, fine for HD. Would I use it in the jungles of Cambodia? I think I would pick an AR for that. AR is battle proven. But I would LIKE to be able to trust my RDB that much, but I currently don't.

I do think the RDB has the potential to prove very reliable. It just needs to be tested harder.

I would like to see some serious hard core testing of the RDB.
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TNC
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« Reply #28 on: May 07, 2018, 11:36:43 AM »

Many/most of us tend to think we're going to need our firearms for some apocalyptic event in the future, and therefore all firearms need to be at a level of absolute, military level of reliability and durability.  That's not a bad thing, but in reality that can be a little unrealistic IMO.

I love my Tavor and AUG bullpups which do have a military background and design.  Even then if the "Walking Dead", "Red Dawn", "Battle Los Angeles" scenarios ever actually unfolded and only had the option of grabbing the "one" firearm for the survival of humanity, I wouldn't even consider any other rifle besides my 16" home built AR15. 

I probably shoot that particular AR15 less than many of my other rifles, but it's the one rifle I'd be comfortable with total reliability, more-than-adequate performance, and availability of replacement parts.  This may vary according to where one lives, but I live in the U.S. where I'd likely find enough replacement parts to choke a horse for an AR if even necessary.  I could also have a bag of critical replacement parts in a pack that would address most any service issue.  My take on this has nothing to do with how good an AUG or Tavor is in quality or performance.  They are great.

On the bullpup market I'd say buy the rifle you can afford and shoot the heck out of it.  If that's an RDB I don't think you'll lose a wink of sleep tossing and turning over a subpar purchase.  Just a keep a decent, proven AR15 in the back of the safe for that unlikely apocalyptic scenario.
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cciman
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« Reply #29 on: July 07, 2018, 05:39:09 PM »

Still unasnsered:  How do you clear a stoppage in the RDB?

I owned the RDB, took it out of the box, realized that there are no openings I could stick my fingers into, or even see where the problem could be, not easy to strip it apart without leaving the range.  Sold it.

The IWI fit the bills just fine.  Less cool conceptually, but functionally more logical.



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HBeretta
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« Reply #30 on: July 08, 2018, 03:27:33 AM »

Still unasnsered:  How do you clear a stoppage in the RDB?

I owned the RDB, took it out of the box, realized that there are no openings I could stick my fingers into, or even see where the problem could be, not easy to strip it apart without leaving the range.  Sold it.

The IWI fit the bills just fine.  Less cool conceptually, but functionally more logical.

i agree with your no openings comment which only leaves you to drop/strip the mag to gain visual access to work through a stoppage.  from there you can actually tilt the rifle downward and you'll see two outward facing triangles centered on the downward ejection chute that align with the breech to chamber check without flipping the rifle over to look through the magwell.  on the contrary, i actually think the rifle is very easy to strip...two captive pins and the grip assembly group tilts downward from the receiver allowing access to the bolt assembly group.  very simple and fast to field strip.

i wish i could speak to stoppages more, but i've only had one in over 2k rounds due to a broken firing pin.  that's it.  now the first few rounds in setting up the gas the rifle did short stroke due to not enough gas.  simply removing the mag and racking the charging handle cleared it.       
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